❝ We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for. ❞

— some wise high school kid

nprfreshair:

"There’s power in looking silly and not caring that you do." - Amy Poehler 
Happy Birthday Amy! We can’t wait to talk to you later this fall. 
In case you missed it, here’s our 2009 interview with her. (It’s awesome) 

nprfreshair:

"There’s power in looking silly and not caring that you do." - Amy Poehler 

Happy Birthday Amy! We can’t wait to talk to you later this fall. 

In case you missed it, here’s our 2009 interview with her(It’s awesome) 

yes, I’m a workaholic
❝ ♫ first day of school—I don’t give a fuck ♫ ❞
7 September 2014    Reblog    
❝ For many young writers from different ethnic backgrounds, it comes down to this: They believe the diversity they experience in their daily lives should be reflected in the books they read and the stories they write. And if a culture that supports that doesn’t yet exist, they are willing to create it. ❞

— Lynn Neary, “In Elite MFA Programs, The Challenge of Writing While ‘Other,’” from NPR (via bostonpoetryslam)

❝ I don’t explain cultural things, with italics or with exclamation or with side bars or asides. I was aggressive about that because I had so many negative models, so many Latinos and black writers who are writing to white audiences, who are not writing to their own people. If you are not writing to your own people, I’m disturbed because of what that says to your relationship to the community you are in one way or another indebted to. You are only there to loot them of ideas, and words, and images so that you can coon them to the dominant group. That disturbs me tremendously. ❞

— Junot Díaz, with Diógenes Céspedes and Silvio Torres-Saillant (1996)

29 August 2014 ♥ 2,628 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from anti-circle    source: famphic
Advice to Freshmen

Behind the smiles and thank you’s elicited from cheery greetings of Welcome to College! I’m sure there’s still a million questions on your mind. What classes do I take? What clubs should I join? What friendships will I make?

The thing is, you’ll be confronted with even more questions throughout your college experience—questions of identity. So is this who I really am? Why is it that people see me differently from who I really am?

And while you can ask others for their advice and guidance, ultimately it’s up to you to find your own answers.

gaydicks420:

verygaygirlfriendfoxmulder:

gaydicks420:

gaydicks420:

new aesthetic: surreal pop punk

your shorts are glowing and are made of a material not known to this world. your vans die and regenerate every night. every band does covers of gregorian chants. your bangs extend into infinity.

fall out void

Abandon your mortal form and ascend to a higher plane! at the disco

25 August 2014 ♥ 28,480 notes    Reblog    
reblogged from kamayami    source: gaydicks420
day 2/5

of double lyf

22 August 2014    Reblog    
laura-thesedays:

landlocked-selkie:

kateordie:

alaskaskellum:

Something for my feminist theory class.

I’d love to see the reactions to this from a crowd. I can kind of imagine a quiet, solemn understanding from the ladies and a lot of confused questions from the guys… If my memory of art school serves me.

In 9th grade English we read Laurie Halse Anderson’s “Speak”. For those of you who haven’t read it, the author makes it abundantly clear that the teenage protagonist, Melinda, was raped, before the protagonist actually says it.
Our English teacher asked the boys in the class what happened to Mel. They came up with the most ridiculous answers. Every girl in the class just knew.

This just goes to show…
Not all men menace women, but yes all women have felt menaced by a man.
Every girl understands this because every girl knows the fear implicit in this image.

laura-thesedays:

landlocked-selkie:

kateordie:

alaskaskellum:

Something for my feminist theory class.

I’d love to see the reactions to this from a crowd. I can kind of imagine a quiet, solemn understanding from the ladies and a lot of confused questions from the guys… If my memory of art school serves me.

In 9th grade English we read Laurie Halse Anderson’s “Speak”. For those of you who haven’t read it, the author makes it abundantly clear that the teenage protagonist, Melinda, was raped, before the protagonist actually says it.

Our English teacher asked the boys in the class what happened to Mel. They came up with the most ridiculous answers. Every girl in the class just knew.

This just goes to show…

Not all men menace women, but yes all women have felt menaced by a man.

Every girl understands this because every girl knows the fear implicit in this image.

14 August 2014 ♥ 157,649 notes    Reblog    High-Res
reblogged from kamayami    source: alaskaskellum